Total Joint Infection Rates

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Authors
Worthey, Ashleigh
Department
Healthcare Administration
Issue Date
2024-05
Type
Thesis
Language
en_US
Keywords
Orthopedic surgery.::Total joint replacement:: Artificial joints--Complications.
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Abstract
Each year, millions of Americans undergo surgical treatments with orthopedic procedures ranking among the most common. Total joint arthroplasties (TJAs) are a significant part of these procedures, as they involve replacing damaged joints with artificial components to alleviate pain and restore joint function. However, total joint arthroplasties carry certain risks, the most notable being surgical site infections (SSIs), which can lead to more extended hospital stays, additional surgeries, increased healthcare costs, and decreased patient well-being. Patient demographics, comorbidities, and surgical techniques influence the incidence of SSIs following TJAs. As total joint arthroplasties are predicted to become increasingly more prevalent, research also forecasts a rise in SSIs, posing significant challenges to healthcare systems and patient outcomes. Understanding the factors contributing to SSIs, implementing evidence-based preventative measures, and developing strategies to enhance patient safety to reduce these risks is critical. Therefore, exploring the correlation between total joint arthroplasties and postoperative infection rates, identifying risk factors, and assessing the effectiveness of preventative measures are crucial steps in reducing SSIs. All efforts aim to improve patient outcomes and optimize surgical practices for the benefit of patients, healthcare professionals, and organizations. Although providers cannot complete prevention surgical site infections from occurring, there are several ways to minimize contribution. Such prevention methods include antibiotic prophylaxis, proper surgical site preparation, surgical technique, wound closure techniques, and preoperative evaluation of patient health. The more healthcare providers understand the risk factors, the better equipped they are to prevent SSIs.
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Spring 2024 Graduate Project/Thesis/Capstone in Healthcare Administration. Student ID redacted.
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A copyright review process in May 2024 has determined that this item is in copyright, held by the author, Ashleigh Worthey. The written permission of the copyright holder is required for distribution, reproduction, or other use that extends beyond what is authorized by fair use and other statutory exemptions. Responsibility for making an independent legal assessment of an item and securing any necessary permissions rests with person(s) desiring to use the item. http://rightsstatements.org/vocab/InC-EDU/1.0/
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